cover

ITALIAN DESIGNERS AT HOME

ALESSANDRA BURIGANA
Photographs by MARIO CIAMPI

HARDCOVER /240 pages
9-5/8 x 11-1/2 inches / 24.5 x 30 cm
280 color illustrations
ISBN-13: 978-1-905216-03-1


US $ 65

IN STOCK

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DESCRIPTION

Every day we use objects designed to make our lives easier and more pleasant. Chairs, tables, lamps, and drinking glasses all form part of our domestic routine. Many of the most eye-catching examples of these objects were created by Italian industrial designers. But what happens when these designers turn their creative energy toward their own homes? Italian Designers at Home opens the doors to the homes of architects and designers and discovers their routines, idiosyncrasies, and original stories. Like Enzo Mari who cultivates bonsai trees, or Michele De Lucchi who carves miniature houses out of wood, or Dino Gavina who slept in a small cubic structure, in the center of a sixteenth-century room, because it reminded him of the cozy atmosphere of a passenger-train sleeping compartment. Every house has a unique story; every house is a surprise. Beautifully illustrated with 280 color photographs, Italian Designers at Home offers an unprecedented look at more than twenty homes styled by the hand of celebrated Italian design professionals including: Andrea Branzi, Cleto Munari, Alessandro Mendini, Dino Gavina, Mario Bellini, Riccardo Dalisi, Cini Boeri, Stefano Giovannoni, Enzo Mari, Michele De Lucchi, Bob Noorda, Vico Magistretti, and Ettore Sottsass.

AUTHOR

author

ALESSANDRA BURIGANA has been a professional journalist for over twenty-five years and has written for numerous interior design magazines including Architectural Digest, Brava Casa, and Elle Décor. She was the director of La Mia Casa. Currently she collaborates with Casamica and Corriere della Sera.

author

MARIO CIAMPI has been an architectural photographer for more than twenty-five years and his work has appeared in numerous magazines worldwide, and in particular, Casa Vogue and Architectural Digest

REVIEWS

review

3/1/2007

Southern Accents

Our comments: Inspiration is found in unexpected places—that is the essence of Italian Designers at Home. A stimulating visual experience for creative souls, it is filled with breathtaking palettes and beautiful images. Unfolding like short biographies, the book’s 23 chapters reveal the personalities of and personal spaces of individual designers. It is enlightening to glimpse these characters at home, where they are surrounded with the oddities and sometimes eccentric schemes that trigger the creative process. Viewed casually, their choices feel introspective and mysterious: Colors do not match, shapes appear awkward, and functions seem void. But in each designer’s home, arrangements and insights await the eye, inviting closer inspection. We love the chapter on the complicated and exceedingly ordered Milanese industrial designer and architect Vico Magistretti, who says, “The way you dress corresponds reasonably closely to the way you live: you present yourself as you are. … Your clothing, like your home, says a great deal about you.”
Our favorite quote: Anna Gili says, “I think that it is not possible to do good design by copying other styles. I think what you have to do is find you way within our own culture.” (Amanda Kathryn Smith)

review

11/1/2006

Shelter: The Best of Design

Italian Designers at Home

Designers make their way into other people’s homes every day, through the lamps they set alight, the sofas they sinuously seduce us with, the eye-catching accessories they fashion. What a treat it would be, then, to turn the tables (and the chairs, lamps and bookcases) and see how the other side lives. Italian Designers at Home does just that, escorting us on a walking tour through the personal spaces of the mavericks whose style savvy has penetrated our domestic universe.

Architectural photographer Mario Ciampi and interior design writer Alessandra Burigana team up to provide affectionate and thorough portraits that illustrate how each feature designer’s milieu is governed by his or her philosophy while simultaneously influencing their creativity. Still, what makes each of these 23 featured homes special is that which lives between the walls: a cocktail of “culture, design, creativity, personal history, memories, interpretation and exploration,” writes Burigana.

review

11/1/2006

Metropolitan Home

Two dozen of the boot peninsula’s most important, influential and visible contemporary designers show off their own living spaces in this colorful and stylish book (with photography by Mario Ciampi). More than an at-home visit with Ettore Sottsass, Vico Magistretti and Aldo Cibic, for example, the book is full of top-drawer ideas adaptable for your very own home.

review

11/1/2006

Interior Design

Featuring intelligent text by Alessandra Burigana and stunning photography by Mario Ciampi, this coffee-table book is superior to most of those that take us into the homes of the famous. Best of all is the wide variety of genuinely interesting houses and apartments that 26 talented interior designers, architects, and product designers call home.

Some have chosen rural settings, but most have chosen cities. Andrea Branzi and Anna Gili live in former industrial buildings. Cini Boeri’s apartment is strictly contemporary, but her windows overlook one of Milan’s most picturesque churches, the Basilica Sant’Ambrogio. Some have found genuine palazzi: Dino Gavina lives in a 16th century palazzo in Bologna and sleeps in a small cube at the center of a spacious salon; Massimo Scolari lives in a 17th century Venetian palazzo dappled by the city’s famous light: Mario Bellini lives in the center or Milan, in a 19th century palazzo with frescoed vaulted ceilings and a grand garden. Personal idiosyncracies are obvious: Vico Magistretti has custom cabinetry for more than 100 custom-tailored shirts; Enzo Mari cultivates bonsai trees; Michele De Lucchi carves wood into minature houses; Fabio Novembre’s stair has a red handrail, heart-shape in section. The most beautiful residence shown may be Antonio Annichiarico’s in the Apulian countryside. Built as a monastery in the 10th century and used as a hunting lodge in the 18th, the house features a stone patio adorned with sprinkled rose and bougainvillea petals.